Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Light Explored in Arthouse1’s ‘The Sky’s Gone Out’

John Greenwood

In a new show at Arthouse1 London, the artistic element of light is explored through a collection of artists who utilize the source in different ways. "The Sky's Gone Out" features the work of Vasilis Avramidis, Gordon Cheung, Sean Dawson, Bella Easton, John Greenwood, Chris Hawtin, Rui Matsunaga, John Stark and Mimei Thompson. (The show was curated by Easton and Hawtin.)


John Greenwood

In a new show at Arthouse1 London, the artistic element of light is explored through a collection of artists who utilize the source in different ways. “The Sky’s Gone Out” features the work of Vasilis Avramidis, Gordon Cheung, Sean Dawson, Bella Easton, John Greenwood, Chris Hawtin, Rui Matsunaga, John Stark and Mimei Thompson. (The show was curated by Easton and Hawtin.)


Gordon Cheung


Sean Dawson


Vasilis Avramidis


Rui Matsunaga


John Stark

“Borrowing the title from the eighties music band Bauhaus, Easton and Hawtin use the title paradoxically to ask the questions, ‘Where would we be without natural light, and do we even need it nowadays?’” a statement says, “querying if our relationship to light is now not just located in the global geographic territories of night and day, but how electric lighting illuminates at our whim, ensuring that we are no longer tied to the diurnal cycle. The light we recognise now may not be from the external geo-space but from the internal, introspective light of the screens that accompany us everywhere. The light of the sun, the original primary light source, has now even become a problem we need to control in order to better view the new light we have created. This exhibition explores how our relationship to light in the world has been affected by these changes and how painters have responded to these new optical conditions.”

See more of the work below.


Mimei Thompson


Bella Easton


Chris Hawtin

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Jesse Jacobi’s massive, forested scenes are packed with creatures and ruins, each a dive into a dreamlike, yet vivid world. The vibrant acrylic works make use of camouflage and show seemingly alien civilizations. And on the time and place shown in this works, the artist admit it’s not clear, “but the setting is, I can say with certainty, very far removed from modernity and anything involving current times.”
The vibrant work of Erik Jones takes an intimate step in a new series of images under the title “Armor” at Jonathan Levine Projects next month. The works mix acrylics, watercolor, pencil, water-soluble wax pastel, and other materials. Jones last appeared on the HiFructose.com here, and he crafted the cover for and appeared in Hi-Fructose Vol. 27.
Mr. Everybody’s paintings offer a clash of bleak imagery and playful vibrancy. The works, often minimalist in execution, tell of both street art and classical influences, with elegant figures and pop culture iconography playing a role. The artist's own practice feels at home on both a gallery wall and a public wall.
The mysterious portraits of Belgian painter Eddy Stevens are filled with stirring symbols that invite the viewer to unpack their meanings. Though his work has a certain timeless quality that recalls 16th- and 17th-century painters, his work is also filled with contemporary flourishes and progressive approaches to the craft.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List