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Jannick Deslauriers Crafts Eerie Textile Sculptures

Jannick Deslauriers uses textiles to create ghostly, massive sculptures. Whether it’s a time-worn car or a cityscape, her works appear as structures that can be passed through. She uses darker threads as her "pencil outlines," blending textures and techniques to create pieces that resemble little else.

Jannick Deslauriers uses textiles to create ghostly, massive sculptures. Whether it’s a time-worn car or a cityscape, her works appear as structures that can be passed through. She uses darker threads as her “pencil outlines,” blending textures and techniques to create pieces that resemble little else.

“Jannick Deslauriers’ textile sculptures are the ultimate contrast between form and function,” a statement says. “Take her almost life-size tank made of delicate fabric: She draws attention to the intrinsically violent use-value of an object by reducing it to a fragile and easily damaged sculpture. Her use of transparent fabric evokes a ghost-like presence and highlights the ephemeral nature of varying objects like a piano or an apartment building.”

See more of her works below.

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