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Sara Catapano’s Biomorphic Ceramic Sculptures

Sara Catapano’s ceramic sculptures appear as absorbing, yet disconcerting biomorphic forms that defy their medium. Though there are otherworldly qualities to these pieces, the artist's observations here on Earth play a direct role in the creation of her work. She says that “these bio-expressive forms are, in some ways, reactions and responses to social and personal experiences.”

Sara Catapano’s ceramic sculptures appear as absorbing, yet disconcerting biomorphic forms that defy their medium. Though there are otherworldly qualities to these pieces, the artist’s observations here on Earth play a direct role in the creation of her work. She says that “these bio-expressive forms are, in some ways, reactions and responses to social and personal experiences.”

“The relationship between the natural world and the metropolis of man is, at times, harmonious; however it is a habitual power struggle for dominance, progression and survival,” the artist says. “I employ forms, textures, and compositions found in nature as design elements in my sculptures to juxtapose against architectural components that exist in materials reminiscent of industry. I fuse an abstracted reference to plants, bacteria, and geological systems with patterns of growth, decay, degradation, erosion, and gestation to create a biomorphic ingredient which both confronts and reacts to the minimal and formalistic component.”

See more works from the artist below.

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