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Eva Redamonti’s Dynamic, Hyperdetailed Scenes

Eva Redamonti’s dynamic, hyperdetailed drawings blend futurism and fantasy, her works often packed with tension and movement. Part of that tension can also be found in her approach, as she uses both India Ink on paper and digital coloring methods. Her work often moves between human and machine—with absorbing transitions.

Eva Redamonti’s dynamic, hyperdetailed drawings blend futurism and fantasy, her works often packed with tension and movement. Part of that tension can also be found in her approach, as she uses both India Ink on paper and digital coloring methods. Her work often moves between human and machine—with absorbing transitions.

“My artwork has developed itself over the years,” a statement says. “This was partly through practice, but also through the influence of life’s day-to-day experiences without touching pen to paper. Fantasy and imagination are important elements in my work. By combining movement, structure, symmetry and detail, I try to obscure the lines between cosmic fantasy and reality while creating a three-dimensional space within two-dimensional media.”

Redamonti, a Berklee College of Music, is also a composer and flutist. Her musical practice is active alongside her work in visual art. See more of her recent work below.

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