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Mike Campau’s ‘Anti-Social’ Series Looks at Digital Platforms

Artist Mike Campau combines photography and digital techniques for his “Antisocial” series, a project that takes a pointed look at digital platforms we use to communicate. For much of the work, there’s a cynical beauty in the details, with letter boards reflecting our frivolous behavior and dependency on social media. In a statement, he offers some insight into the series:

Artist Mike Campau combines photography and digital techniques for his “Antisocial” series, a project that takes a pointed look at digital platforms we use to communicate. For much of the work, there’s a cynical beauty in the details, with letter boards reflecting our frivolous behavior and dependency on social media. In a statement, he offers some insight into the series:

“Social Media is starting to get some pull back, and rightfully so,” he says. “Each platform has it’s own problems, but all have had a large impact on society as a whole, both good and bad. Each image takes place in an empty parking lot which is a symbol of our singularly isolated posts, but placed in a location where it can be easily seen by many.”

See more of the work (and process shots) below.


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