Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Camille Rose Garcia at Dorothy Circus Gallery

Los Angeles-born artist Camille Rose Garcia crafts vibrant, horror-infused paintings. A new show at Dorothy Circus Gallery in Italy, titled “The Ballrooms of Mars,” compile a new body of work from the artist. Her multimedia pieces are often cited as being influenced by Max Fleischer, Disney, ’50s-era films, and the work of William Burroughs. The show kicks off Feb. 24 and runs through April 7.

Los Angeles-born artist Camille Rose Garcia crafts vibrant, horror-infused paintings. A new show at Dorothy Circus Gallery in Italy, titled “The Ballrooms of Mars,” compile a new body of work from the artist. Her multimedia pieces are often cited as being influenced by Max Fleischer, Disney, ’50s-era films, and the work of William Burroughs. The show kicks off Feb. 24 and runs through April 7.


“‘The Ballrooms of Mars’ explores the outer space dimension, the mysterious features of Space and the universal language of nature made of ‘patterns in the vibrations of sound,’” a statement says. “We are led in a journey through distant and magical dimension, in which we encounter mysterious creatures and Ziggy Stardust-like characters – born from Camille Rose Garcia’s imagination but also undoubtedly influenced by popular heroes like David Bowie.”

See some works from the show below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
While collecting stones along the east coast of his hometown in Maine, it dawned on artist Alan Magee how the beauty of an object draws in its own attention. His hyperrealistic acrylic and oil paintings look unbelievably like photographs, capturing the quiet intensity of those stones, pebbles and rocks that demanded his contemplation. Each is arranged in softly lit, zen like compositions, where Magee has stacked them like cairns or on top of other objects, while in other pieces, they appear scattered like a starry Milky Way galaxy, bleached white by the sun and sand with their own stories to tell.
Manic characters grin wildly in Aaron Johnson's over-the-top, explosive paintings. The Brooklyn-based artist's work overflows with gross-out humor and in-your-face sexuality, which he renders in a color palette of hyperactive, neon acrylics. While paintings on fabric comprise the majority of his work, Johnson has an ongoing series of sculptural sock paintings (made from used, donated socks from his social media followers, mind you) that evoke both assemblages and D.I.Y. puppetry. Darkly funny, Johnson's gag-filled work nods to the over-saturation of violent and sexual imagery in our media culture with its blatant absurdity.
The practice of Jesse Draxler, who recently illustrated the cover of the new Daughters album, combines painting and photographic collage. Working primarily in grayscale, both the artist’s illustrative and fine art work are packed with harrowing portraits. The artist has also crafted work for the bands Vowws and Deafheaven.
Using transparent cloths clad to the canvas, painter Pavel Gempler creates a "second skin, through which the lower pictorial layers shine through and create an irritating doubling," the artist says. The result is both captivating and creates a pixelated effect to his works, which then carry photograph-like benefits of the light.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List