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Aaron Glasson’s Biographic, Vibrant Murals

(A collaboration with Celeste Byers) Aaron Glasson’s murals, though surreal and vibrant in an otherworldly sense, are firmly grounded in reality, often depicting real people and their personal journeys. The artist, born in New Zealand and living in the U.S., crafts murals across the world, in addition to work in illustration and gallery paintings. He cites his themes as “relationship to the natural environment, community empowerment and education, indigenous knowledge, the subconscious, and the unseen.” Several of his recent murals are collaborations with artist Celeste Byers.


(A collaboration with Celeste Byers)

Aaron Glasson’s murals, though surreal and vibrant in an otherworldly sense, are firmly grounded in reality, often depicting real people and their personal journeys. The artist, born in New Zealand and living in the U.S., crafts murals across the world, in addition to work in illustration and gallery paintings. He cites his themes as “relationship to the natural environment, community empowerment and education, indigenous knowledge, the subconscious, and the unseen.” Several of his recent murals are collaborations with artist Celeste Byers.


(A collaboration with Celeste Byers)


(A collaboration with Celeste Byers)

Each of the murals like the top piece have their own narratives. Here’s Glasson’s writing on this woman: “The woman depicted is Doña Margarita dressed in her Mayan Ipil. She was first of four generations of women of her family to live in this apartment complex, now her great granddaughter, Totis, is growing up here (that’s Totis’ teddybear) and Margarita’s daughter Irma feed us everyday while we painted. Beside her is a Saber-tooth Tiger that lived in the area long ago whose bones were found in a nearby cenoté. Only 50 years ago the land of Cancun was dense jungle, inhabited by Mayans for thousands of years. The painting is about the ever changing nature of where these apartments sit and the life that has dwelled there.”


(A collaboration with Celeste Byers)

See more of his work and collaborations below.


(A collaboration with Celeste Byers)


(A collaboration with Aec Interesnikazki)


(A collaboration with Celeste Byers)

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