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The Surreal Sculptures of Carlos Tardez

Carlos Tardez has a talent for portraiture across two- and three-dimensional forms. Yet, it’s in his sculptures that the surreal nature of his works becomes visceral, whether evoking laughter, intrigue, or both. These small figures are often paired with normal-sized, found objects. These interactions create strange narratives.

Carlos Tardez has a talent for portraiture across two- and three-dimensional forms. Yet, it’s in his sculptures that the surreal nature of his works becomes visceral, whether evoking laughter, intrigue, or both. These small figures are often paired with normal-sized, found objects. These interactions create strange narratives.

“In Carlos Tardez´s sculptures there´s an idea of a game of meanings, just as the child looking for shapes in the clouds, from which good, bad and even worse ideas arise but all of them being valid,” a Bea Villamarín Gallery statement says. “The shortest or most well-known path is not always the best or the only one. It´s all about re-reading, looking for another point of view, using a preconceived idea or an object associated with a meaning and giving it a twist.”

See more of his work below.



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