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Smithe’s Vivid, Psychological Illustrations

Smithe’s visceral illustrations disassemble and mechanize the human head, exploring both psychological ideas and how the body can be manipulated. Whether it’s on a screen or adorning a massive wall, his works warrant extended contemplation. The artist often offers process images on his Instagram account.


Smithe’s visceral illustrations disassemble and mechanize the human head, exploring both psychological ideas and how the body can be manipulated. Whether it’s on a screen or adorning a massive wall, his works warrant extended contemplation. The artist often offers process images on his Instagram account.

“Born and raised in Mexico City, Smithe began drawing around age 12,” says Fifty24SF Gallery. “Influenced by the local graffiti artists in his neighborhood, Smithe would walk the city and look at the graffiti on the walls. He was intrigued by how quick you could get a message out. Smithe’s art has opened many doors for him as he has traveled the world showing his work, with shows in England, Belgium and Germany.”

See more of the artist’s work below.

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