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Mi Ju’s Wild, New Mixed-Media Paintings

South Korea-born, Brooklyn-based artist Mi Ju creates wild, intricate works crafted from acrylic paint, cut paper, and thread. In each corner of these pieces are small landscapes and scenes, each worthy of its own observation. The artist's work has been shown in Denmark, across the U.S., and her native South Korea.

South Korea-born, Brooklyn-based artist Mi Ju creates wild, intricate works crafted from acrylic paint, cut paper, and thread. In each corner of these pieces are small landscapes and scenes, each worthy of its own observation. The artist’s work has been shown in Denmark, across the U.S., and her native South Korea.

“Her large, labor-intensive and layered works toy with the micro and macro and explore such themes as pollution, global warming, food chains, and extreme weather conditions,” a recent statement says. “Tiny ecosystems accumulate over large surfaces, creating intricate universes composed of marks and color.”

The artist is a graduate of Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, San Francisco Art Institute, and Yeungnam University in South Korea. See more of her recent work below.

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