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Lee Jinju’s New, Painted Explorations of Memory

Lee Jinju’s surreal scenes and studies, often rendered in Korean paint on linen, explore memory and psychological iconography. Her paintings move between sparse elements and intricate narratives. A statement reminds us that “negative events and emotions of the past, which were not even wanted, endlessly appear and disappear within the everyday life.” The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here and appeared in Hi-Fructose Vol. 27.


Lee Jinju’s surreal scenes and studies, often rendered in Korean paint on linen, explore memory and psychological iconography. Her paintings move between sparse elements and intricate narratives. A statement reminds us that “negative events and emotions of the past, which were not even wanted, endlessly appear and disappear within the everyday life.” The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here and appeared in Hi-Fructose Vol. 27.

“From the superfluousness cut from a well-made frame, following their softly soundless stories, cuddling the insignificant and petty motifs of the everyday, I discover the unconscious sensuous layer that is hidden inside,” the artist said, in a past statement. “At that moment, I become a melancholic adventurer and the everyday is reborn into things of the extraordinary.”

See more of Jinju’s recent work below.

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