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The Flamboyant Digital Work of Kota Yamaji

The flamboyant, eye-popping works of digital artist Kota Yamaji carry touches of psychedelia and surrealism. Using both stills and motion work, his pieces blend textures and patterns to absorbing effect. The Tokyo-based artist has also created music videos for tilt-six and INNOCENT in FORMAL.

The flamboyant, eye-popping works of digital artist Kota Yamaji carry touches of psychedelia and surrealism. Using both stills and motion work, his pieces blend textures and patterns to absorbing effect. The Tokyo-based artist has also created music videos for tilt-six and INNOCENT in FORMAL.


“His artwork is mainly created by computer graphics,” a statement says. “He creates not only graphic art but also video art. The characteristic of his artwork is pleasant colors, surrealistic visuals and motifs. He is inspired by surrealism artists such as Salvador Dali, Giorgio de Chirico, René Magritte.”

Yamaji is a graduate of Tama Art University in Tokyo. See more of his recent work, including video, below.

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