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Decktwo’s Engrossing, Architecture-Influenced Drawings

Decktwo’s absorbing drawings combine influences from architecture and an organic energy that powers urban environments. Thomas Dartigues is the actual name of the artist, who is a former street artist who switched to crafting massive works in markers. Decktwo is based in Paris.

Decktwo’s absorbing drawings combine influences from architecture and an organic energy that powers urban environments. Thomas Dartigues is the actual name of the artist, who is a former street artist who switched to crafting massive works in markers. Decktwo is based in Paris.

“The city is one of my favorite sources of inspiration,” the artist says, in a statement. “Its sprawling energy that spreads its tentacles from the center outwards, its ways of networking and connectivity, the way its evolution is expressed through scale – all of it makes up the DNA of my creations. The city is an entity with two faces: it is a place of tension and power struggles, but also it is an incredible energy vessel. This dynamic is one of the foundations of my work – the pulsating force that pushes me to rethink the city. By reinventing the perception of its energy and playing with the scale, I tend to create an immersive world in which everyone can dive and get inspired.”

See more work from Decktwo below.

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