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Koichi Enomoto Toys with Reality, Mythology in Paintings

Japanese artist Koichi Enomoto packs his oil paintings with manga influences, dystopian visions, and pop culture nods. Often, these pieces offer a dialogue about mankind’s relationship with technology, in particular. The artist calls his work “my private myth, like a vision, rising from the relations between my own and public reality.”

Japanese artist Koichi Enomoto packs his oil paintings with manga influences, dystopian visions, and pop culture nods. Often, these pieces offer a dialogue about mankind’s relationship with technology, in particular. The artist calls his work “my private myth, like a vision, rising from the relations between my own and public reality.”

“My painting is a reality” the artist said, in a statement. “However, this reality is the image of the world, which is created under the globalized perspective in the contemporary world where we cannot have the common sense of values and each person has their own un-exchangeable standards. I gather good and evil, truth and falsehood, ancient and modern from the overload information to create the world image. Each individual has their own peculiar actualities. I always see and hear the public realness that news organizations are reporting, shutting myself in my own actuality.”

See more recent work from the artist below.

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