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Miami Art Week 2017 Diary: Part 2

Jordan Wolfson In this installment, we focus on the big one. As daunting and seemingly endless as Art Basel Miami Beach can seem, the the 500,000 square-feet of exhibition space yields opportunities to see both worthy emerging and trusted talent alongside the other. The sampling size is quite massive: more than 4,000 artists and more than 200 galleries represented.

In this installment, we focus on the big one. As daunting and seemingly endless as Art Basel Miami Beach can seem, the the 500,000 square-feet of exhibition space yields opportunities to see both worthy emerging and trusted talent alongside the other. The sampling size is quite massive: more than 4,000 artists and more than 200 galleries represented.


Jordan Wolfson


Koichi Enomoto


Chloe Wise

The veteran artists to appear in the fair include Kehinde Wiley, who was recently commissioned to paint the official portrait for President Barack Obama. (Pieces by Amy Sherald also appear in the neighboring Untitled. But more on that show tomorrow.) Meanwhile, Mary Boone Gallery’s inclusion of a recent Peter Saul piece: “President Trump Becomes a Wonder Woman, Unifies the Country and Fights Rocket Man.” And speaking of pieces that stirred passers-by: Paul McCarthy’s “White Snow Dwarf, Bashful” regularly gathers crowds.


Paul McCarthy


Kehinde Wiley


Yinka Shonibare MBE

Some of the more provocative work continued the conversation around the tension between technology and the traditional, as in the case of Damian Ortega’s enormous, circuit board rug. Elsewhere, Tony Tasset’s melted snowman sculpture adds humor, while Chloe Wise’s oil paintings absorb at Almine Rech Gallery’s section.


Tony Tasset


Damian Ortega

See more sights from the fair below. And check out the first installment from our diary here.


Andrea Bowers


Paulina Olowska


Firelei Baez

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