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Amber Ma’s Whimsical, Personal Illustrations

No matter the materials used, Amber Ma can craft a whimsical, absorbing narrative. The New York City-based illustrator uses her experience under China’s one-child policy as an influence in her works. She’s worked in watercolors, Sumi ink, pen, and as evidenced above, colored pencil.

No matter the materials used, Amber Ma can craft a whimsical, absorbing narrative. The New York City-based illustrator uses her experience under China’s one-child policy as an influence in her works. She’s worked in watercolors, Sumi ink, pen, and as evidenced above, colored pencil.

“(She) is deeply interested in creating monsters and fantasy creatures, who she believes share the world with us while hiding in secret places,” a statement says. “The inspirations for most of the projects are from her childhood experience … Culture, mystery, story and human daily life. She believes people can tell a story and the story is from life. Everything, every moment, every element could be a good story.”

Ma has a MFA in illustration (visual essay) from the School of Visual Arts. She’s created both personal work and has had clients like Simon & Schuster. See more of her work below.

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