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Alma Haser Swaps Pieces of Her Puzzle Portraits of Twins

Alma Haser is known for adding surreal, sculptural twists to her portraits. One of her new series sees the photographer creating puzzles out of images of identical twins, then swapping every other the piece of the separate portraits for absorbing results. Haser didn’t know where facial features would end up in this process, offering a surprise to both the artist and the viewer. Haser was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 31.

Alma Haser is known for adding surreal, sculptural twists to her portraits. One of her new series sees the photographer creating puzzles out of images of identical twins, then swapping every other the piece of the separate portraits for absorbing results. Haser didn’t know where facial features would end up in this process, offering a surprise to both the artist and the viewer. Haser was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 31.

“Alma Haser has always found identical twins fascinating, as do most people,” a recent statement says. “It is the incredible realisation that there are two versions of the exact same person; hard to tell apart, unless they wear different clothes or hairstyles. They often finish each other’s sentences, as they are one and the same person. Monozygotic or identical twins occur when a single egg is fertilized to form one zygote which then divides into two separate embryos. Monozygotic twins are genetically almost identical. Identical twins do not have the same fingerprints because, even in the confines of the womb, the foetuses touch different parts of this environment, creating small variations in the same fingerprint and therefore making each of them unique.”

In the initial stages of this series, Haser only swapped certain parts of the portraits. See more of her recent work below.

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