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Anthony Hurd’s Wild, Internal Landscapes

Anthony Hurd’s vibrant, chaotic landscapes carry the complexity of our emotional states. They are at once elegant and arrested, inviting and dangerous. Overall, it may seem like a more abstract direction for the artist, yet in another sense, it’s explorations are wholly human. Hurd says several life events are in the make-up of this work: the loss of a sibling, the end of a relationship, mental hardship, and several other factors play into these paintings.


Anthony Hurd’s vibrant, chaotic landscapes carry the complexity of our emotional states. They are at once elegant and arrested, inviting and dangerous. Overall, it may seem like a more abstract direction for the artist, yet in another sense, it’s explorations are wholly human. Hurd says several life events are in the make-up of this work: the loss of a sibling, the end of a relationship, mental hardship, and several other factors play into these paintings.

“The work is a bit of a celebration of survival, and the depths of darkness that have revealed his own personal greatest truths,” a statement says. “Namely that most everything he thought about himself is unfounded, untrue, that life is the unknown, that he is an emotional being, that his connection with the world is to be determined by his own actions and pursuit. Ever changing, always a work in progress, his work and process are fluid, and changes on a whim, without a plan from its creation, seeing where the roads lead, hoping for a peaceful and educational resolve.”

Hurd recently released a book of these paintings, titled “Internal Landscapes.” See more of these works below.

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