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Ulla-Stina Wikander’s Cross-Stitched Household Objects

Ulla-Stina Wikander, an artist living in Stockholm, creates cross-stitched sculptures using domestic and everyday objects as her base. Wikander isn’t dissuaded by the complex edges and surfaces of machinery and furniture: Each piece becomes a surreal, yet familiar art object when embroidered by the artist. Depending on the project, time spent on each work can vary wildly.

Ulla-Stina Wikander, an artist living in Stockholm, creates cross-stitched sculptures using domestic and everyday objects as her base. Wikander isn’t dissuaded by the complex edges and surfaces of machinery and furniture: Each piece becomes a surreal, yet familiar art object when embroidered by the artist. Depending on the project, time spent on each work can vary wildly.

“I find it interesting to see how these objects transforms in a new context; the obsolete, the things we do not want any longer, the old and forgotten things,” the artist says, in a statement. “I give them a second life and although I cut the embroideries into pieces, I still think they look very beautiful, when the objects has been ‘dressed up.’ I visit fleamarkets and vintage stores to find cross stitch embroideries and the objects I want. Some of the small objects like a iron or a telephone take me a day or two to make, but the bigger installations takes weeks to finish. Over the last few years I have had exhibitions for my cross stitch objects and installations and they have also been available for purchase.”

Wikander also has her own design company, Manussweden, which specializes in handbags. She’s had an artistic practice since 1986.

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