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Inside the Worlds of Ribbonesia

"Ribbonesia," a Japanese duo consisting of Baku Maeda and Toru Yoshikawa, creates and populates worlds out of ribbons. The flora or fauna depicted could be studied as individual, elegant components. Yet, together, the exhibitions take on an immersive, unthinkable quality, all using a simple and nondescript material.

“Ribbonesia,” a Japanese duo consisting of Baku Maeda and Toru Yoshikawa, creates and populates worlds out of ribbons. The flora or fauna depicted could be studied as individual, elegant components. Yet, together, the exhibitions take on an immersive, unthinkable quality, all using a simple and nondescript material.

“Just as an artist would use hundreds of brush strokes, ribbon forms can also be made from a variety of twists, bends and folds,” a statement says. “Art works will sometimes be very simple and understated like ‘Origami’, or tangled and very complicated. They become paintings as much as they are sculptures. Ribbonesia focuses on natural shapes because we see an essential beauty in every regularity and complexity within the natural world, its necessity, and how it functions as a whole.”

See more examples of the pair’s works below.

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