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Nazar Bilyk’s Metal Figures Toy With Perspective

Using materials like glass, bronze, and other metals, Ukraine-born artist Nazar Bilyk creates surreal figures that shift perspectives and expectations. Much of his work is an exploration of man’s relationship with the natural world. Whether in a public art context or an indoor setting, the works toys with the viewer, depending on his or her distance from the work.

Using materials like glass, bronze, and other metals, Ukraine-born artist Nazar Bilyk creates surreal figures that shift perspectives and expectations. Much of his work is an exploration of man’s relationship with the natural world. Whether in a public art context or an indoor setting, the works toys with the viewer, depending on his or her distance from the work.

On the above work, “The Space Around,” a statement describes both the specific piece and the Kiev-based artist’s broader charge: “On one hand, this work is anthropocentric, it focuses on person’s image, but on the other, the human outline dissolves in an ideal shape of a sphere, and along with it, in the environment,” a statement says. “Using the counterform, which precedes the appearance of form in sculpture, the artist pays attention to the inner world and sees the external world through it, looks into the process of creation itself, slightly pushing the veil of secrecy, but leaving room for speculation.”

See more recent work from the artist below.

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