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Peter Saul’s ‘Fake News’ Blends Current Politics, Art History

Peter Saul’s surreal acrylic paintings have reflected, challenged, and parodied the status quo for the past six decades. In a new show at Mary Boone Gallery in New York, titled “Fake News,” Saul tackles the era of Trump in a new collection of paintings that rethink pieces of art history in the process. Saul was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

Peter Saul’s surreal acrylic paintings have reflected, challenged, and parodied the status quo for the past six decades. In a new show at Mary Boone Gallery in New York, titled “Fake News,” Saul tackles the era of Trump in a new collection of paintings that rethink pieces of art history in the process. Saul was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

“In the current exhibition, Saul tackles art history and its celebrities, as well as a present-day aspirant and his conundrums,” the gallery says. “Rembrandt’s 1642 masterpiece is re-imagined as an unthreatening militia of costumed ducks in Nightwatch II, Gainsborough’s beloved portrait subject cools off in Blue Boy with Ice Cream Cone, and the Texas Revolution takes a gruesome turn in Return to the Alamo. Donald Trump in Florida and Quack-Quack, Trump depict our presiding President in a variety of ignoble situations, oblivious to the imminent catastrophe presented in Global Warming, the Last Beer.”

The show runs through Oct. 28 at the gallery’s Chelsea location.

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