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Ella & Pitr Paint Refugee in Mural on French Dam

French pair Ella & Pitr once again tackle a topical social issue in their latest major mural. At more than 150 feet high, “Le Naufrage de Bienvenu (The Sinking of Welcome)” tells of a refugee seeking passage between the mountains on either side of Piney's dam in the Valley of the Gier in Loire. Ella & Pitr were last featured on HiFructose.com when they created the world's largest mural.

French pair Ella & Pitr once again tackle a topical social issue in their latest major mural. At more than 150 feet high, “Le Naufrage de Bienvenu (The Sinking of Welcome)” tells of a refugee seeking passage between the mountains on either side of Piney’s dam in the Valley of the Gier in Loire. Ella & Pitr were last featured on HiFructose.com when they created the world’s largest mural.

The website ISupportStreetArt offers this insight on the duo’s work: “They draw sleepy giants, large birds with heavy wings, dustpan, eaters children, piles of stones, chairs or charred trunks. Sometimes they suggest to passers photographed in front of large posters contained picture frames and send them their contributions; more than 4,000 have been already posted on their site.”


Notice that the refugee is holding a picture of the same dam in which he’s attempting passage. The title of the piece hints at what ends up waiting for those looking for a new home. Other recent murals below.

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