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Luke O’Sullivan’s New Explorations of ‘Undiscovered’ Worlds

Luke O’Sullivan, a printmaker and sculptor based in Philadelphia, combines media and perspectives to detail fictional environments. In "Rise and Shine,” a new show at Paradigm Gallery, O’Sullivan offers a collection of new work that he says are about exploration and adventure. “I make sculptures that illustrate invented and undiscovered worlds,” the artist tells us.

Luke O’Sullivan, a printmaker and sculptor based in Philadelphia, combines media and perspectives to detail fictional environments. In “Rise and Shine,” a new show at Paradigm Gallery, O’Sullivan offers a collection of new work that he says are about exploration and adventure. “I make sculptures that illustrate invented and undiscovered worlds,” the artist tells us.

A statement from the gallery details his influences: “The playful nature of O’Sullivan’s work draws from Nintendo games, maps, science fiction movies, and movie set design. Likening his process to a lego set, the artist employs screen printed drawings in order to assemble two- and three-dimensional works that depict cities, labyrinths, and fantastical objects that embrace themes of exploration and adventure. Each drawing and sculpture contributes to an ongoing catalogue of a strange and invented world.”

The show kicked off on Sept. 22 and moves through Nov. 11.

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