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Liqen’s Wild Works on Paper and Murals

Spanish artist Liqen somehow moves between the paper and the public wall without compromising his intricate, absorbing linework. His wild creations often carry surreal sensibilities and a hidden treasure in every corner. The artist's work tends to be influenced by an early passion in nature, and in specific, the diversity of species and sights it provides.

Spanish artist Liqen somehow moves between the paper and the public wall without compromising his intricate, absorbing linework. His wild creations often carry surreal sensibilities and a hidden treasure in every corner. The artist’s work tends to be influenced by an early passion in nature, and in specific, the diversity of species and sights it provides.


“All this leads to the point of adopting Liqen, the name of a pseudo-vegetable, as his meta-name, starting a worldly adventure through his own disturbance, under which he signs his pieces and decrypted character transpolar symbiotic and scientifically the mixture reciprocal of two species, algae and fungus, as a novelty in evolution that is separated from its ancestors, and which is able to adapt to adverse weather conditions,” a statement says.


In the past few years, his murals and works on paper and canvas have popped up across the world.

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