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Justin Bower’s Fractured Portraits Evolve

Justin Bower’s abstracted, fractured faces maintain a sense of intimacy. In his latest oil on canvas works, Bower’s evolved this approach with new, startling “glitches.” He's current part of the group show "Los Angeles Painting: Formalism to Street Art" at Bruno David Gallery in Missouri, and he was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Justin Bower’s abstracted, fractured faces maintain a sense of intimacy. In his latest oil on canvas works, Bower’s evolved this approach with new, startling “glitches.” He’s current part of the group show “Los Angeles Painting: Formalism to Street Art” at Bruno David Gallery in Missouri, and he was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

“The ongoing decoding of the human body, a formula to each individual’s genome, confronts us with a radical question of ‘What are we? Am I a code that can be reduced and multiplied infinitely?’” a statement says. “Bower’s paintings begin to open a dialogue to this destabilizing effect/trauma technology has on the individual that has infected the daily lives of contemporary man.”

Bower is a San Francisco native, and his work has been shown across the world. His awards include a Feitelson Fellowship Grant and a Joan Mitchell Award in 2010.

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