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C7’s Moody Illustrations Use Acrylics, Ink, and Coffee

C7 is the moniker of Hiroko Shiina, a Japanese artist who creates surreal and bleak illustrations with multiple tools. She’s used acrylics, ink, colored pencil, and even coffee to craft her moody works. Her works appears to be informed by dreams, the natural world, and isolated emotions.

C7 is the moniker of Hiroko Shiina, a Japanese artist who creates surreal and bleak illustrations with multiple tools. She’s used acrylics, ink, colored pencil, and even coffee to craft her moody works. Her works appears to be informed by dreams, the natural world, and isolated emotions.

“The artist reveals her vision of a wonderfully weird existence,” a statement from Gallery G-77 says. “Images seem weightless. Borders between reality, memory and dream, fear and pleasure of expectations are blurred. Thus creates some uncertainty among a multiplicity of meanings – sensation of the evanescent. There is the male presence – ‘half-aerial attendant,’ who is a passive witness to the process and who is adding the recognition of this experience. Hiroko Shiina is not reproducing forms, but capturing invisible forces and rendering them visible.”

The coffee adds to the surreal nature of these scenes, adding strange tones and abstractions to the characters and backdrops.

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