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Alejandro Pasquale’s Veiled, Painted Portraits

Alejandro Pasquale’s surreal paintings are mysterious portraits, with the faces of subjects often obscured in flora or masks. These youthful explorations often come in varying moods, from wonder to melancholy and even loneliness. The painter uses oils, acrylics, and graphite to fuel these ideas. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.


Alejandro Pasquale’s surreal paintings are mysterious portraits, with the faces of subjects often obscured in flora or masks. These youthful explorations often come in varying moods, from wonder to melancholy and even loneliness. The painter uses oils, acrylics, and graphite to fuel these ideas. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

“On the images of my artworks I attempt to show what there is beyond the linearity of the story of the characters portrayed,” the artist says, as quoted by Veronica Solivellas. “I compose with the idea of expressing worlds or scenes created by the imagination of these characters. I use masks that cover their faces as a metaphor for the liberation of their imagination; even by covering their faces no signs or gestures; if they are angry, sad or smiling. They are just standing in a neutral pose, suspended at a time in which their imagination emerges and transports them to a desired moment.”

The artist was born in Buenos Aires in the 1980s. Recent shows have taken the artist’s work to Toronto, his native Argentina, and beyond.

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