Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Surreal Oil Paintings of Jonas Burgert

Jonas Burgert’s oil paintings are packed with surreal figures and fluorescent hues. These strange scene sometimes appear as both piles and explosions of disparate objects and beings, with still faces staring above them. His single-figure studies, meanwhile, are often wrapped and confined, yet eerily content. He was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Jonas Burgert’s oil paintings are packed with surreal figures and fluorescent hues. These strange scene sometimes appear as both piles and explosions of disparate objects and beings, with still faces staring above them. His single-figure studies, meanwhile, are often wrapped and confined, yet eerily content. He was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

“Burgert’s inspirations are multiple and derived from diverse ideologies and cultures,” a statement says. “They come from postcards, literature or images of the Indian Holi Festival of Colours, or from the artist’s voyage to Egypt, where he visited the remnants of its ancient culture. Certainly, a major source of inspiration lies in art history. It has often been said that Burgert’s work picks up on strands of Late Renaissance thought, particularly the Mannerist’s love of the grotesque and the curious, of harsh and crass colour disparities and of an exaggerated, ‘unnatural’ style. Other notable inspirations are Hieronymus Bosch, Pieter Bruegel, El Greco, Tintoretto, Poussin and Max Beckmann.”

The German painter is currently based in Berlin. He’s a graduate of the Academy of Fine Arts in Berlin, and he also studied under Dieter Hacker.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Filipino surrealist Jon Jaylo creates brilliantly colored and riddled oil paintings inspired by poetry and stories. His paintings have earned him the moniker "The Enigma" for his puzzling depictions of a parallel universe where animals wear clothes, children take on adult personas and gravity ceases to exist. Jaylo has said that he is never completely satisfied with his style, which varies from piece to piece, influenced by a range of artists like Rene Magritte, Paul Delvaux, Gustav Klimt, Frida Kahlo, Salvador Dalí, and William Bougereau. Opening September 12th, Jaylo will make his US debut with his solo exhibition "As the Moon Draws Water" at Distinction Gallery in California.
Dino Valls is highly influenced by the Spanish masters and their studies of the human form. As a representative of the Spanish vanguard of figurative art, Valls's portraits are precise, sensual, mysterious and surreal. He expands the methods of 17th-century Spanish and Italian masters by employing formal figurative techniques as the medium through which to explore the human mind in a framework filled with symbolism.
Ben Howe’s arresting oil paintings offer hyperdetailed and eerie reflections on humanity. A new show at beinArt Gallery in Australia collects his newest paintings under the titled “Weave.” The new show tackles “themes of mortality, isolation, longing, melancholy and loss and sits somewhere between the physical constraints of reality and the anarchic realm of the subconscious.” Howe was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.
Amy Bennett's engrossing paintings, with figures and objects rendered in a miniature scale, present scenes from the everyday from unexpected vantage points. These perspectives are aided by the artist first building "miniscule three-dimensional models" from wood, plastic, and other materials before she begins painting, says Miles McEnery Gallery. Her new show at the New York City gallery begins this week and runs through Aug. 16.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List