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Peter Adamyan’s Sardonic Mixed-Media Portraits

Peter Adamyan’s mixed-media works integrate oil painting, wood, and often, objects like credit cards, VHS tapes, and vinyl records to offer strange, yet intimate portraits. The Californian artist mixed humor and earnestness in his works, often a reflection of pop culture and contemporary living.


Peter Adamyan’s mixed-media works integrate oil painting, wood, and often, objects like credit cards, VHS tapes, and vinyl records to offer strange, yet intimate portraits. The Californian artist mixed humor and earnestness in his works, often a reflection of pop culture and contemporary living.

“Television was his father, his mother a constantly running generator, working harder and harder to keep the television set on,” a statement says. “His favorite toy growing up was paper and pencil, which he used to draw his favorite cartoon characters and super heroes. Nothing has changed but the cartoon characters and superheroes he chooses to draw. Now living in Oakland, CA Peter is an artist who uniquely combines religious, political, and popular culture references that he confronts heartily with sardonic humor and surprising twists.”

These portraits move between private citizens and the more recognizable figures of today, including our very own President Donald Trump. The artist’s use of Cheetos as a makeshift crown for Trump is indicative of Adamyan’s signature sardonic style.

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