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David Deweerdt Explores Dreams, Nightmares in Paintings

David Deweerdt's mixed ink and acrylic paintings appear as both absorbing—and at times, nightmarish— visions. Hidden within each corner of his figures are surprising textures and patterns.

David Deweerdt‘s mixed ink and acrylic paintings appear as both absorbing—and at times, nightmarish— visions. Hidden within each corner of his figures are surprising textures and patterns. According to Art Compulsion, the artist has only recently begun to show his work publicly, despite having made pieces for decades.

“It is in the expression of his own fears and nightmares that David Deweerdt finds the source of his paintings,” a statement on that site says. “It is his way of exorcising all of his inner demons, which take on monstrous forms and which recall so forcefully those who inhabit us also.”

Deweerdt has spent the past two decades aiding adults with disabilities, behavior disorders, and autistic disorders. Part of his work with them includes workshops on artistic expression. He has an educational background in both painting and specialist education.

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