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Yasmine Weiss’s Strange, Intimate Portraits

Yasmine Weiss describes her works as “pretty realistic but not quite.” These oil paintings and drawings carry a surreal quality, with touches of the intimate and the disconcerting. Weiss says she has always had a fascination with humanity, and as being hard-pressed to explain why is part of the engine that fuels her work.


Yasmine Weiss describes her works as “pretty realistic but not quite.” These oil paintings and drawings carry a surreal quality, with touches of the intimate and the disconcerting. Weiss says she has always had a fascination with humanity, and as being hard-pressed to explain why is part of the engine that fuels her work.



The artist lives and works in Brussels, Belgium. She recently designed the album cover for Diapsiquir’s “180°.”

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