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Beauty, Death Collide in Jordan Griska’s ‘Wreck’ Sculpture

Jordan Griska’s “Wreck,” consisting 12,000 pieces of mirror-finish stainless steel, was created over two years. The Brooklyn-based sculptor crafted the reflected piece with several motivations in mind.

Jordan Griska’s “Wreck,” consisting 12,000 pieces of mirror-finish stainless steel, was created over two years. The Brooklyn-based sculptor crafted the reflected piece with several motivations in mind.


Griska offers this explanation of “Wreck”: “Wreck is based on a computer-generated model of a luxury sedan, in a video game, which was manipulated to look like it was involved in a crash that resulted in a fatality … The perfect geometry and flawless materiality of the piece reflect the inspiration of idealized digital design, in stark contrast with the grimness of the reality it represents. Beauty, technology and engineering collide with death and reality.”

Griska is also responsible for the work “Grumman Greenhouse,” an “upright and contorted WWII B-52 bomber is currently installed in Philadelphia.” That piece is an actual greenhouse, with solar panels and edible vegetables and herbs created inside.


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