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Tim Molloy’s Strange, Vivid Worlds

New Zealander Tim Molloy crafts strange worlds in his illustrations, comics, and commercial work. Recalling artists like Moebius and Jim Woodring, Molloy's rich, detailed pieces are packed with surreal imagery. The artist’s tight linework makes his dreamlike narratives into vivid jaunts into the unknown.

New Zealander Tim Molloy crafts strange worlds in his illustrations, comics, and commercial work. Recalling artists like Moebius and Jim Woodring, Molloy’s rich, detailed pieces are packed with surreal imagery. The artist’s tight linework makes his dreamlike narratives into vivid jaunts into the unknown.

“Tim Molloy makes weird art, mostly in the form of comics and watercolour paintings,” beingArt Gallery says. “He is inspired by the occult, religion, horror, science fiction, psychedelia and a lifetime of bizarre dreams. Tim’s work is an ever-expanding and interconnected web of strange images and tales ­soaked heavily in delusion, confusion and a general sense of unease and in which gags and tentacles cavort and writhe in equal measure.”

The Molloy comic “Mr Unpronounceable and the Sect of the Bleeding Eye” nabbed Best Graphic Novel at the Aurealis Awards in 2015 and his the book “Necromancer” has also won several Ledger Awards in Australia. Molloy also creates work for bands, including his own, Plague Doctor.

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