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Michael Murphy’s ‘Come Together’ Installation at Wonderspaces

Installation artist Michael Murphy is wowing with his work currently showing at the Wonderspaces pop-up event in San Diego. “Come Together,” an installation made of 2,200 descended parts, appears as a closed fist at certain angles. Murphy uses the phrase “Perceptual Art” to describe his works, which often contain meticulously crafted installations that depend on perspective.

Installation artist Michael Murphy is wowing with his work currently showing at the Wonderspaces pop-up event in San Diego. “Come Together,” an installation made of 2,200 descended parts, appears as a closed fist at certain angles. Murphy uses the phrase “Perceptual Art” to describe his works, which often contain meticulously crafted installations that depend on perspective.

Wonderspaces runs in San Diego through July 30, with several artists like Adam Belt, John Edmark, Karina, and Smigla-Bobinski. “You can think of Wonderspaces as a pop-up museum of extraordinary experiences,” the event says. “Those experiences range from room-sized interactive art installations to virtual reality films and include art enjoyed at the world’s biggest festivals and fairs.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/BVN14gPBs-p/?taken-by=brittniahrens

https://www.instagram.com/p/BU0H7vwDe8e/?taken-by=perceptual_art

Visitors on social media have offered looks at the piece from differing angles. Check out past works from the artist below.
https://www.instagram.com/p/BU3AeF3jMYD/?taken-by=perceptual_art

https://www.instagram.com/p/BPeM4p-hMQB/?taken-by=perceptual_art

https://www.instagram.com/p/BP_xAdjhz8K/?taken-by=perceptual_art

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