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Hula’s Massive Figurative Murals Adorn Waterways

Hula is the moniker of artist Sean Yoro, who creates massive, delicate murals above waterways and alongside abandoned structures. The self-taught painter was raised in Oahu, where he engaged with the ocean as a surfer before embarking on a path in street art and tattooing. Today, he creates his massive figures in oil paint and creates pieces across the world.

Hula is the moniker of artist Sean Yoro, who creates massive, delicate murals above waterways and alongside abandoned structures. The self-taught painter was raised in Oahu, where he engaged with the ocean as a surfer before embarking on a path in street art and tattooing. Today, he creates his massive figures in oil paint and creates pieces across the world.


“Influenced by his love of the ocean, Hula took to the water to create semi-submerged murals, while balancing on his stand up paddleboard,” a statement says. “Hula strives to bring life to empty spaces, usually working on shipwrecks, abandoned docks and forgotten walls. Merging his backgrounds in both street and fine art, Hula works entirely with oil paint and uses traditional techniques to create soft, female figures interacting with the surface of the water. Hula’s work often leaves you feeling an array of emotions while proposing an environmental discussion.”

As the environment is a major concern for the artist, he says that “all oil paints and mediums used for each project are completely non-toxic, made with alkali-refined linseed oil or safflower oil and natural pigments. Not only are these vegetable oils completely non-toxic, they are also commonly used in health and beauty products.”

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