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Gunjan Aylawadi’s Intricate, Paper-Woven Art

Gunjan Aylawadi's intricate paper-weaving technique produces vibrant, surprising creations. In each work made by the artist, born in India and now based in Australia, seems to defy its materials and exists “between craft traditions, sensory pleasures she experienced growing up and the new culture she finds herself in now.” In a recent show, she continues her evolution into work that extends beyond two dimensions.

Gunjan Aylawadi‘s intricate paper-weaving technique produces vibrant, surprising creations. In each work made by the artist, born in India and now based in Australia, seems to defy its materials and exists “between craft traditions, sensory pleasures she experienced growing up and the new culture she finds herself in now.” In a recent show, she continues her evolution into work that extends beyond two dimensions.

“In the last few years, my slow meditative paper weaving practice has evolved from two-dimensional paper tapestries to three-dimensional geometric sculptures,” Aylawadi says, in a statement. “In this show, I have attempted to create a body of work exploring the idea of prayer and carving out a place for personal meditative contemplation. Inspired by the geometry, architecture and arabesque patterns in temples/churches/mosques that I grew up around, these works are an invitation to viewers to pause, observe, contemplate and rest.”

The self-taught artist is a qualified industrial designer and computer science engineer. She took part in the International Biennial of Paper at the CODA Museum in the Netherlands in 2015. Her current show, “A Place for Prayer,” runs through July 23 at Koskela in Australia.

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