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Cayetano Ferrández Explores Shades of Humanity with ‘Gray Man’ Figures

Cayetano Ferrández, a Spanish artist/photographer, uses his “Gray Man” action figures and micro-narratives to explore varying, often bleak aspects of humanity. His work, a combination of photography, sculpture, and other mixed-media, has integrated toys since the early 2000s, with the “Gray Man” series being an ongoing project.

Cayetano Ferrández, a Spanish artist/photographer, uses his “Gray Man” action figures and micro-narratives to explore varying, often bleak aspects of humanity. His work, a combination of photography, sculpture, and other mixed-media, has integrated toys since the early 2000s, with the “Gray Man” series being an ongoing project.

In a translated interview, the artist offers some insight on how he views his process and role: “I have always felt photographer, despite being a deserter from the analog process. It was much later, the result of personal evolution and my relationship with the work of other artists, I’ve seen some of them. I think today I’m closer to sculpture than photography. If I had to define myself, I’d say I’m a builder of dramatized scenes that (I) record with my camera.”

The artist, over the years, has toyed with scale with his figures. They’ve appeared in galleries as both massive, their original scale, and through representation in projection and stills. He’s collected the narratives of “The Gray Man” in a book, too (“el hombre gris,” 2014).

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