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Daniel Rueda, Anna Devís Play With Architecture Across the World

Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís, a duo based in Valencia, Spain, travel the world, crafting photographs that use both each other and architecture as characters. Toying with perspective and geometry, each photo the pair publish on their respective Instagram accounts is packed with humor and accompanying text.

Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís, a duo based in Valencia, Spain, travel the world, crafting photographs that use both each other and architecture as characters. Toying with perspective and geometry, each photo the pair publish on their respective Instagram accounts is packed with humor and accompanying text.

Rueda also works as an architect, architectural photographer, and professor. In an interview with More With Less Design, he offered some insight into the pair’s process: “ … The role of these characters in my pictures is to tell a story that goes beyond aesthetics. That is, it is not enough to just have an image that looks more or less beautiful; it has to tell something without the need of putting it into words… While it is true that the texts that accompany the photographs are sometimes as important to me as the image itself.”

Devís is also an architect, photographer, and designer. You can follow their adventures on the Instagram accounts linked above.

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