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Andi Soto’s Intimate Examinations of Humanity, Nature

Andi Soto, a Panama-based artist, uses ink, graphite, prismacolor pencils, gel pens, and other materials to create her intricate figures, often bare and seemingly vulnerable. Soto often removes flesh and other elements while adorning her female characters with head-dressings. Yet, the parts that remain are rendered in absorbing and detailed linework. In the past, the artist has described her style as “knitting with ink.”

Andi Soto, a Panama-based artist, uses ink, graphite, prismacolor pencils, gel pens, and other materials to create her intricate figures, often bare and seemingly vulnerable. Soto often removes flesh and other elements while adorning her female characters with head-dressings. Yet, the parts that remain are rendered in absorbing and detailed linework. In the past, the artist has described her style as “knitting with ink.”

The artist often relates her process on her Instagram, as she adds, arranges, and builds each work. “I am inspired by human anatomy and emotions, combined with complex line arts and soft yet brutal botanical and zoology studies,” the artist says.

In an interview with winterskinrose, the artist comments on why many of her subjects are female: “All the women I draw are kind of part of my own personality. They all look like they are waiting for something, longing, almost in a permanent state of dreaming.”

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