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Pichi & Avo Travel Through Periods of Art History in New Murals

Street artists Pichi & Avo bring a blend of surrealism and classic urban art to walls across the world. Within these works, a conversation occurs between what we know as modern street art and iconography and styles of centuries far gone. The Spanish duo, in particular, has been referencing classical mythology in a slew of recent murals that have appeared in Miami, Hawaii, and New York.


Street artists Pichi & Avo bring a blend of surrealism and classic urban art to walls across the world. Within these works, a conversation occurs between what we know as modern street art and iconography and styles of centuries far gone. The Spanish duo, in particular, has been referencing classical mythology in a slew of recent murals that have appeared in Miami, Hawaii, and New York.


“Their style adopts a focus which is both beautiful and performative, firm in its discussion and totally the perfect deconstruction of classic art and contemporary urban art in order to create a new fusion, which whilst faithful to its classic heritage, creates a new and exciting vision of art,” the artist says, in a statement. “PichiAvo are one since 2007, fleeing from the self-centeredness of graffiti, united to create a single piece of work, reciting a conceptually urban poetry, born from the artistic formalism of the street, transferring fragments of a wall to the canvas and from the canvas to the wall in a personal version.”



In these worlds, Greek statues exist among tags and the complexity of both forms are highlighted.

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