Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Deborah Simon’s ‘Flayed’ Bears Reflect on Human, Animal Relationships

Deborah Simon, a Virginia-born, New York-based artist, creates sculptures that explore “the reality of the animal and the vulnerability imbued in toy.” Though her sculptures appear to be taxidermy, series like “Flayed Animals” are made entirely from hand. She uses materials like polymer clay, faux fur, acrylic paint, wire, foam, glass, and embroidery materials to create these animals, mostly focusing on bears.

Deborah Simon, a Virginia-born, New York-based artist, creates sculptures that explore “the reality of the animal and the vulnerability imbued in toy.” Though her sculptures appear to be taxidermy, series like “Flayed Animals” are made entirely from hand. She uses materials like polymer clay, faux fur, acrylic paint, wire, foam, glass, and embroidery materials to create these animals, mostly focusing on bears.


“My work walks the line between taxidermy, toy and sculpture,” the artist says, in a statement. “Each sculpture is meticulously fabricated to create an unnervingly accurate but slightly off version of the natural animal. Evolution has always held a particular fascination for me, informing how I create and group the animals in my work. As I’ve read and dug through museum collections to research my pieces, western science’s mania for labeling, codifying and collecting has stood out.”

The bear has become a focus of this series due to it being an iconic toy, in the form of the teddy bear. Simon reflects on inconsistent humans are with animals, in which are loved and hated, killed without care and idolized. In her works, the tension arises with how the artist combines the child-friendly aesthetic and the interior of the animal, the familiar and the unsettling.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
In a major installation at Tolarno Galleries in Melbourne, Christopher Langton built his own immersive system of celestial bodies, robots, and organisms resembling viruses and fungi. “The hyperreal manifestation of Langton’s own recent experiences beset by life-threatening disease and infection, ‘Colony’ beckons us to consider that we are all multi-cellular symbiotic organisms, negotiating a precarious shared ecology,” the gallery says.
There's something oddly beautiful about the work of Kansas based artist Jamie Bates Slone. Her vibrant sculptures are teaming with diseased growths and discolorations, and the effect is simultaneously fascinating and horrifying. Slone can relate to the physical and emotional impact that disease brings. "Through conjured memory, I revisit my family’s history with illness and premature death. These memories are flooded with emotion and anxiety that I use as the base of my sculptural work," she says.
Claire Partington's ceramic figures blend 18-century dress and elegance with contemporary touches and beastial transformations. In her new show at Winston Wächter Fine Art in Washington, new works from the London artist are offered. "The Hunting Party" runs June 8-July 27. Partington was last featured on HiFructose.com here.
Blending two- and three-dimensional forms, Mark Whalen creates cerebral and absurd arrangements of the human body. Whether stacking vibrant heads or using sculpted hands to sculpt the very shapes of canvases, there’s a metatextual component in tackling the act of creating art itself.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List