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Jessica Dalva Explores ‘Dream House’ in New Show

Jessica Dalva, a sculptor and illustrator based in Los Angeles, has a new show at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia titled "Dream House." Her "three-dimensional illustrators" are framed works that allow the viewer to peek into a fictional room, with contemplative scenes and changeable lighting situations. This adds a new layer to interactivity to several of the works. Dalva was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Jessica Dalva, a sculptor and illustrator based in Los Angeles, has a new show at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia titled “Dream House.” Her “three-dimensional illustrators” are framed works that allow the viewer to peek into a fictional room, with contemplative scenes and changeable lighting situations. This adds a new layer to interactivity to several of the works. Dalva was last featured on HiFructose.com here.


She has this to say about her new show: “A lot of these pieces were therapeutic (as I find much of art making in general) not only in resolving thoughts for myself but in that, in order for the idea to be realized, many processes had to be repeated over and over,” the artist says, in a statement. “These steps, such as cutting out and gluing together hundreds of tiny paper leaves, became a calming and peaceful meditation, a welcome repetitive task in an overwhelmingly sad and frustrating world.”


Dalva attended the Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, beefore moving onto to solo and group shows across the U.S. She’s also “dabbled” in set design, puppetry, life-sized costuming, and other endeavors.

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