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Chad Knight Channels ‘Overactive’ Mind Into Daily Digital Creations

Chad Knight’s vibrant digital art moves between the meditative and the frenetic. A 3D designer with Nike by the day, the artist’s personal work seems to exist in alien worlds, with his works being made in Cinema 4D. These are places inhabited enormous, elaborate beings that appear in mid-evolution. The artist posts a new creation each day on his Instagram account, part of an ongoing, prolific effort.

Chad Knight’s vibrant digital art moves between the meditative and the frenetic. A 3D designer with Nike by the day, the artist’s personal work seems to exist in alien worlds, with his works being made in Cinema 4D. These are places inhabited enormous, elaborate beings that appear in mid-evolution. The artist posts a new creation each day on his Instagram account, part of an ongoing, prolific effort.

“… The reason I make art is because I have a very overactive, noisy mind,” Knight said, in an interview with Klassik Magazine. “Creating art is one of the few things that allows me to totally present. I skateboarded professionally for 16 years. During that time, it served as my creative outlet. Now that I do not have the opportunity to do it as often, combined with being less enthusiastic about broken bones, my 3D explorations have become my new outlet.”

That overactive mind is put to use in his daily project. Previous to his work with Nike, the artist had worked as a 3D modeler for Vans and DC Shoes. But the artist’s former career as a skateboarder ended in 2011, when Knight retired.

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