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Carlos Bracho’s Photographs Explore Humanity in Nature, Melancholy

Carlos Bracho, a photographer from Panama, creates surreal scenes that are often a dramatic blend of nature, humanity, and abstraction. Also a biotechnologist, the artist crafts images that “explore my life experiences in images that combine frustration, loneliness and human behavior in a mixture that (also) combines nature and decay environment.”


Carlos Bracho, a photographer from Panama, creates surreal scenes that are often a dramatic blend of nature, humanity, and abstraction. Also a biotechnologist, the artist crafts images that “explore my life experiences in images that combine frustration, loneliness and human behavior in a mixture that (also) combines nature and decay environment.”



Whether it was loss of a parent or other hardships, Bracho sees photography as a therapeutic aspect of his life. He began working as a fine art photographer 7 years ago, and he says “art has contributed to reestablish my senses in every obstacle I’ve faced.”






He says this on his current series: “In the beginning of January 2016 I got assaulted and then again photography was there as a cathartic way to keep my mind busy in something useful, to redirect my energies into a creative path, taking that bad event and turning it into something new to my eyes, satisfying my thirst to create. With the ‘Botanica’ series, I could also include that nature I love to be, but because that last event I felt I couldn’t add just because I was too afraid of going out to the woods, but also, thanks to that incident my mind decided to add those plants in my portraiture and since then I’ve been building what is now my latest photography series.”




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