Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Stickymonger Uses Vinyl, Ink-Like Cut-Outs Comprise Pop Murals

Stickymonger” is the moniker of Brooklyn-based artist Joohee Park. Cutting giant sheets of vinyl, the artist installs her pop-influenced works piece by piece. These stickers reflect a range of emotions, from anxiety and prejudice to a decidedly darker aspect of the artist.

Stickymonger” is the moniker of Brooklyn-based artist Joohee Park. Cutting giant sheets of vinyl, the artist installs her pop-influenced works piece by piece. These stickers reflect a range of emotions, from anxiety and prejudice to a decidedly darker aspect of the artist.




The artist’s fascination with “fluid and sticky blackness” comes from her upbringing. “Growing up in Korea, in a home adjacent to her family’s gas station, Park’s backyard housed six fuel-storage garages,” a statement says. “There, the future artist would hide among the oil cans, often stepping in and playing with the dense black petroleum puddles that were ubiquitous in her world. Her subjects are visceral:darkness, prejudice, and anxiety are represented as eyes, holes and little girls, allowing the viewer to vicariously experience Stickymonger’s sardonic signification viewpoint of human nature.”




In a recent project, on the 69th floor of the World Trade Center 4 has a gallery space, and Stickymonger created “stickers” for all of its windows. Whether it’s windows or walls, the artist uses the cut-outs and negative space to construct makeshift murals in spaces across the world. The artist, an MFA graduate from Pratt Institute, has been involved in solo and group shows in New York, Los Angeles, Miami, and Seoul, Korea.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
After mainly painting in his homeland, Russian artist Rustam Qbic has spent the last couple of months traveling around the world, creating monumental murals everywhere from Australia to the Swiss Alps. Recently, he was invited to Urban Samtidskunst in Oslo, Norway, where he painted a fresh new piece, titled "Water of Life".
French artist Koralie creates vibrant, absorbing wall art and works on canvas that combine influences from both traditional and contemporary Japanese art, African and English history, and even wallpaper design. Her works appear publicly and inside galleries across the world.
Nemo's crafts illustrations and murals with vague, sometimes grotesque characters often shown in reflection or anguish. When the viewer looks past the unsettling circumstances of these drawings and paintings, they may find something relatable in the emotions evoked in each piece. Just like the name of the artist, the works serve multiple functions.
Public art and murals add an imaginative dimension to the daily humdrum of city life — a cause public art project Forest For The Trees is championing in Portland at Hellion Gallery. The gallery is currently hosting a two-week pop-up fundraiser show for FFTT, which is gearing up for a mural series in late August featuring the likes of Blaine Fontana, DAL, Faith47, Know Hope, Mary Iverson and many other international and Portland-based artists. The current group show at Hellion Gallery features works from a small selection of artworks from some of the participants: an assemblage by Fontana, psychedelic paintings by Brendan Monroe, a landscape collage by Mary Iverson and more. The exhibition is on view through May 30. Stay tuned for news about the Forest For The Trees mural series later this summer.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List