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Diane Meyer Plays With Memory, Distortion by Embroidering Photos

Diane Meyer emulates pixels and digital imaging with cross-stitched embroidery, sewn into her photos. Whether it’s a series of travel captures or her own, personal family snaps, Meyer explores both intersecting eras of photography and the concept of memory itself. The result is something that both distorts and celebrates the longevity of these experiences.

Diane Meyer emulates pixels and digital imaging with cross-stitched embroidery, sewn into her photos. Whether it’s a series of travel captures or her own, personal family snaps, Meyer explores both intersecting eras of photography and the concept of memory itself. The result is something that both distorts and celebrates the longevity of these experiences.

“I am interested in the disjunct between actual experience and photographic representation and photography’s ability to supplant memory,” Meyer says, of the series “Time Spent That Might Otherwise Be Forgotten.” “By borrowing the visual language of digital imaging with an analog process, a connection is made between forgetting and digital file corruption. The tactility of the pieces also references the growing trend of photos remaining primarily digital-stored on cell phones and hard drives, but rarely printed out into a tangible object.”

Meyer’s “Berlin” series took this concept along the entire 104-mile circumference of the Berlin Wall. The artist, who has an MFA from the University of California in San Diego, has had her work shown across the world. Recent shows occupied spaces in New York, Germany, Chicago, and Utah. Meyer is currently based in Los Angeles.

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