Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Meredith Dittmar’s Intricate New Sculptures Hold Surprises

Meredith Dittmar, a sculptor living Portland, uses polymer clay to create intricate structures that draw lines between technology, biology, and our own consciousness. Hidden within geometric shapes, vanishing lines, and architecture, simulations of the familiar emerge, like faces and hands. Depending on how the viewer focuses and chooses to be present, new aspects of the work are revealed. Dittmar was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Meredith Dittmar, a sculptor living Portland, uses polymer clay to create intricate structures that draw lines between technology, biology, and our own consciousness. Hidden within geometric shapes, vanishing lines, and architecture, simulations of the familiar emerge, like faces and hands. Depending on how the viewer focuses and chooses to be present, new aspects of the work are revealed. Dittmar was last featured on HiFructose.com here.




In a new show at San Francisco’s Mirus Gallery, Dittmar offers 23 new works and a site-specific installation. “Between Our Eyes” kicks off Jan. 20 at the space and will be up through March 3. The title of the exhibition is a nod to the distance between the human face’s eyes, which gives us the ability to discern depth and dimension.




From a statement from the artist: “I work with demanding perspectives. On an invisible curved surface these lines emerge on their own, discovered and unplanned. Some of the perspectives are quite challenging to hold at the same time… soften your eyes and relax to see them at once… This metaphor serves neatly: Relax a fixed point of view and hold paradox perspectives simultaneously.”


Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
While Dirk Staschke's past work has had a meticulously polished look, his latest series of sculptures for his upcoming solo show, "Executing Merit" at Seattle's Winston Wachter Fine Art, reveal the rough-hewn edges of his process. Staschke (whom we featured in HF Vol. 23) creates opulent ceramic still lifes that evoke 17th-century vanitas paintings. In his previous pieces, he labored to conceal the evidence of his hand-executed process. His latest work, however, juxtaposes pristinely glazed forms with unglazed, unrefined surfaces, exposing the craft behind Staschke's typically immaculate work. "Craft and skill have always been important in my work and by examining this further my recent sculptures have become an exercise in relinquishing control," wrote Staschke in his artist statement. "Executing Merit" opens on March 3 and will be on view through April 15.
Zemer Peled's porcelain work emerges from an inherently violence process. She smashes her handmade ceramics to pieces and uses the shards as new sculpting material. Peled constructs organic shapes out of the jagged fragments, evoking floral arrangements and at times, biomorphic, abstract masses. But despite her freeform, intuitive process, the Israeli artist creates her final sculptures with great attention to organization and detail. The shards appear nearly uniform and are carefully juxtaposed next to one another to create rhythmic shapes that emulate nature.
Jorge Mayet’s miniature floating sculptures serve as compelling metaphors for the artist's complex relationship to his native country. Mayet was born in Cuba, yet has been living and working in Mallorca, Spain as an expatriate. Despite the circumstances, his sculptures are devoid of any intentional political statement. Instead, they explore the artist's personal experiences with exile and displacement, and the powerful nostalgia for one's homeland left behind.
Using video work and other technology, Maarten Baas creates clocks that appear to be inhabited by men who appear to be manually keeping time, each actually a 12-hour recorded performance being displayed. He’s created these in varying scales, from human-sized grandfather clocks to the major project Schiphol clock, located international terminal of an Amsterdam airport.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List