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Gosia’s Bold, Emotional New Sculptures

Gosia, a Poland-born, Toronto-based sculptor, creates feminine figures with touches of the surreal, whether reflecting the natural world or expressions that extend from inside of the characters themselves. Each of these sculptures contain both elegance and emotional complexity, often containing a new sense of drama at each angle. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 41, and she was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.


Gosia, a Poland-born, Toronto-based sculptor, creates feminine figures with touches of the surreal, whether reflecting the natural world or expressions that extend from inside of the characters themselves. Each of these sculptures contain both elegance and emotional complexity, often containing a new sense of drama at each angle. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 41, and she was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.





“Beneath the Waves,” a recent piece from the artist, was recently part of the group show “Beneath the New Waves,” which explored underwater realism and surrealism. The sculpture, crafted in polymer gypsum, embodies the artist’s ability to use the body as both a canvas and foundation to create something new entirely.


“Color and line are important elements in my work.” the artist said, in a statement. “They help to capture and communicate the most important aspect of my work, emotion. I am a sensitive person, and while I create whatever I feel somehow gets trapped inside the art. The viewers feel that same emotion. It has become the norm that whenever someone talks to me about my one of my pieces, they inevitably end up describing to me how they feel when they look at it, as well as what they see.”



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