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The Surreal, Unsettling Paintings of Kenne Grégoire

Kenne Grégoire, a painter often associated with the movement New Dutch Realism, moves between still-life paintings and more surreal scenes that capture a humane sadness and other complex emotions, rendered in acrylics. The artist uses techniques derived from the 17th century, yet he approaches his work in a way that pushes the form, twisting perspective and hues to create ambiguous points of view and situations.


Kenne Grégoire, a painter often associated with the movement New Dutch Realism, moves between still-life paintings and more surreal scenes that capture a humane sadness and other complex emotions, rendered in acrylics. The artist uses techniques derived from the 17th century, yet he approaches his work in a way that pushes the form, twisting perspective and hues to create ambiguous points of view and situations.




Amsterdam’s Galerie Mokum, which represents the artist, maintains that “whether it is a still live or a scene from the Commedia dell’Arte, in all compositions one can find decay and beauty. The objects in the still lives are never new. They are damaged, dented and rusty because they have been used and have had a life on their own.”


The artist has commented on the limitations of the form, as both a sobering aspect fo what he does and something exciting: “Painting is the utmost devious and inefficient way to capture your ideas and emotions.” the artist says. “But exactly that, the deviousness and many limitations that come with it, make the outdated art of painting so intriguing.”




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